The Way We Used to Breathe (poem)

My first poem published in print ❤
Huge thanks to Untethered.

2016-08-17_23.12.10

IMG_20160823_122158905_HDR - CopyLook at me
like I’m not broken.
Like nothing’s wrong
or changed,
like I haven’t missed
this;
the way you used to breathe.

Surprise Diagnoses | World of Psychology

My 2nd article on psychcentral’s blog just got published 🙂

When I was diagnosed with PTSD at the beginning of the year, it came as a surprise to me. I’d gone to this psychologist for a potential BPD diagnosis. I walked out with not only that, but four years’ worth of PTSD as well. It was surprising because in these four years I’d not once thought about this disorder; it never even occurred to me. But as I thought about it, letting it sink in, things started making sense. And since the diagnosis, I’ve had to think about what happened. Because I really didn’t deal with it; I’m still having trouble figuring out where to go from here. I know it could’ve been much worse. Others have had it so much worse than me. But I’m trying to stop that way of thinking. What happened was awful and it did change me. It does me more harm than good to invalidate my own feelings. February 2012, I was 18 and had been living on my own in Toronto for seven months or so. One morning I was followed. The bus stop was right across from my apartment building. I noticed him

Source: Surprise Diagnoses | World of Psychology

Short Story: One More Last Call by Forrest Jamie

2nd day in a row my name was published incorrectly lol…but this is still hella cool. Thanks WILDsound for this and the cool little interview, and shoutout to Becky Shrimpton for reading my short story 🙂

Novel Writing Festival

Watch the July 2016 Winning Short Story Reading. 

One More Last Call  by Forrest Simcoe

Reading Performed by actor Becky Shrimpton

Get to know the winning writer: 

1. What is your 1pg Short Story about?

My story is about two people coming to terms with the fact that their relationship is over. It starts in the aftermath of the breakup, and so much of their history is hinted at throughout the story. This is their final goodbye to each other; accepting that it’s the end for them not only as lovers, but for their deep friendship as well.

2. What genres would you say this short story is in?

Drama, Romance.

3. How would you describe this story in two words?

Love. Acceptance.

4. What movie have you seen the most in your life?

Oh man, it’s probably a tie between Donnie Darko and A Walk to Remember – two vastly different…

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Always Recovering, Never Recovered | World of Psychology

Thanks to psychcentral for publishing my piece on self-harm!

‘Always recovering, never recovered.’ A simple sentence that can be a harsh reminder. And that’s not to say your efforts or how far you’ve gotten were for naught, but to keep getting back up when you do fall. I’ve learned over the years, of course, that it’s extremely important to know you are not alone. Others are struggling and surviving alongside with you and it’s nothing to be ashamed of. I’ve always had a difficult time accepting the shame part. I’m very back-and-forth on my scars. On one hand, they’re a reminder of what not to do, proof I’ve held on this long. But on the other hand, I hate them. They’re a reminder that I was ever so weak to do such a stupid thing, and now I have to live with the physical proof. The amount of shame and guilt I’ve dealt with not only from myself, but a few loved ones as well, breaks my heart. I can’t help but feel they’re ashamed of me; of knowing me, being who they are to me, as they tell me to cover them up like a dirty secret. Maybe they don’t

Source: Always Recovering, Never Recovered | World of Psychology

Issue 3.1 Launch: Reader Profiles

Ayyy I’m in this 🙂 ❤

untethered

Don’t miss this amazing lineup of readers who will be taking over the second floor of the Monarch Tavern (12 Clinton Street) with us NEXT Wednesday, August 17th at 7 pm!

Trevor Abes(photographer)Trevor Abes is a poet and essayist with a penchant for conceptual art. As part of the Toronto Poetry Slam team (2015), he represented the city in both the Canadian Festival of Spoken Word and the National Poetry Slam. He is currently theatre critic at The Theatre Reader. Photo by Sandro Pehar Photography.

Victoria Butler (photographer)Victoria Butler is a twenty-year-old certified Mom friend, born and bred in Barrie, Ontario but trying to find her future in Toronto. When she’s not having an existential crisis over how to answer the question “What are your plans after university?” she can be found trying to find a unique way to photograph a sunset, attempting to write non-cliche love poetry, or crying on the…

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Vol. 3.1

I am so excited and honoured to be featured in this issue of Untethered. It’s my first publishing in print – thank you to everyone at Untethered for including me! ❤

Forthcoming August 2016   Editors’ Note Dear Reader, In this issue you will find the body controlled, imprisoned, misunderstood, judged, failing, starved, bound, raped, disappo…

Source: Vol. 3.1